Consortium of colleges and universities dedicated to professional development

The Faculty Collaborative

The Faculty Collaborative (TFC) is a new consortium of colleges and universities dedicated to professional development and support. Its agenda is to identify the most pressing issues that confront faculty, explore best practices to address them, and provide expert training and support for their implementation. The Faculty Collaborative must cope with the reality of the continuing pandemic. As a result, our programs currently are virtual. In the future, The Faculty Collaborative will sponsor in-person activities along with virtual programs and confidential teaching consultations throughout the year.

During the Fall and Spring academic semesters, The Faculty Collaborative offers a virtual series of (1) FREE faculty development workshops, (2) FREE special disciplinary seminars, and (3) FREE individual confidential teaching consultations for faculty members at participating TFC member institutions. (See past programs below.)

Workshops

Previous workshops have explored a wide range of topics from Motivating Student Learning, Time Management for Busy Academics, to Writing a Book Proposal and Securing a Publishing Contract. Recent workshop leaders have included Dr. Robert DiYanni, a professor of humanities at New York University (NYU) and a former instructional consultant for the NYU Center for the Advancement of Teaching and Dr. Mary Deane Sorcinelli, Professor Emeritus and Senior Fellow, Center for Teaching and Learning, University of Massachusetts, Amherst. (See past programs below.)

Teaching Consultations

During the Fall and Spring semesters, Professors DiYanni and Sorcinelli also will be available for individual consultations on aspects of teaching and related professional growth to be determined by individuals who sign up for the service. These half-hour consultations, conducted via Zoom, are meant to help teachers respond effectively to challenges faced as they teach and develop their careers. Topics will be determined by participating faculty members. Consultations will be offered on a rolling basis from late September through early November.

Special Disciplinary Programs

In Spring 2022, TFC introduced special disciplinary programs that were convened by eminent scholars in their fields. (See past programs below.)

Collaboration is what the future holds... bringing it into focus...

Coming Up

TFC Fall 2022 Programs

A digital Certificate of Completion will be provided to all who participate in the individual programs.

Learn more about the upcoming programs by selecting one of the blue links below.

Writing Workshops

With Robert DiYanni

Two writing workshops to be offered during the week of September 26th.
Tuesday, September 27 and Thursday, September 29.
Two sessions for each workshop: 9:00 am - 10:30 am and 11:00 am - 12:30 pm (to accommodate different teaching schedules).

I. The Habit of Writing

September 27, 9:00 am - 10:30 am (EDT)

September 27, 11:00 pm - 12:30 pm (EDT)

Making writing a habit is essential for anyone hoping to produce and publish a body of work—blogs, presentations, proposals, articles, books both written and edited. Obstacles to developing the habit of writing, however, are considerable. They include constraints of time and logistics, changing circumstances and increasing personal and professional responsibilities, all of which compete with the work of writing. This workshop explores ways to meet these and other types of challenges, psychological and behavioral and more. Participants can expect to come away with specific strategies to develop their own productive writing habits.

APPLY FOR THE 9:00 AM - 10:30 AM SESSION (EDT) — Tuesday, September 27

APPLY FOR THE 11:00 AM - 12:30 PM SESSION (EDT) — Tuesday, September 27

II. Revising Your Writing

September 29, 9:00 am - 10:30 am (EDT)

September 29, 11:00 pm - 12:30 pm (EDT)

This workshop follows an initial session on the habit of writing—which prompts participants to write something. What’s written needs to be revised—always. Revision is an essential part of the writing process; without revision most writing never reaches its full potential. We can’t revise of course, unless we have written something to work on and work with. A draft is the first essential element of writing to be revised. In revision lies writing’s salvation. This workshop focuses exclusively on revising—on the nature of revision, on strategies for revision. Participants can except to come away with specific approaches to revision from macro to micro—from conceptual revision to structural revision to stylistic revision: revising for idea, for organization, for stylistic elegance and grace—and more.

APPLY FOR THE 9:00 AM - 10:30 AM SESSION (EDT) — Thursday, September 29

APPLY FOR THE 11:00 AM - 12:30 PM SESSION (EDT) — Thursday, September 29

Pedagogy Workshops

With Robert DiYanni

Two pedagogy workshops to be offered during the week of October 3rd.
Tuesday, October 4 and Thursday, October 6.
Two sessions for each workshop: 9:00 – 10:30 am and 11:00 am – 12:30 pm (to accommodate different teaching schedules).

I. Effective Discussion-based Teaching

October 4, 9:00 am - 10:30 am (EDT)

October 4, 11:00 pm - 12:30 pm (EDT)

In college and university seminars and other small classes, teaching often takes the form of discussion, which provides a useful complement to lecturing. Leading productive discussion classes requires both preparation and practice. Effective discussions occur when they possess an explicit, clearly-defined purpose, and when they are summarized and assessed. Good discussions, moreover, are grounded in questions that generate productive thinking for students and instructors alike. Like other active-learning pedagogical strategies, discussion-based teaching needs to be goal directed and learner centered. In this workshop we will consider the benefits and limitations of discussion, along with challenges in its use. Participants can expect to derive clear principles and effective practices for generating and sustaining discussion in their classes, including techniques for responding to students and having them engage in productive cross-talk with one another.

APPLY FOR THE 9:00 AM - 10:30 AM SESSION (EDT) — Tuesday, October 4

APPLY FOR THE 11:00 AM - 12:30 PM SESSION (EDT) — Tuesday, October 4

II. Making Learning Last

October 6, 9:00 am - 10:30 am (EDT)

October 6, 11:00 pm - 12:30 pm (EDT)

One of the biggest challenges confronting teachers and their students is not learning per se, but making learning last beyond the immediate present, beyond midterm and final exams, beyond the semester—making learning endure for the long haul. We want our students to leave our courses having learned for good what we have to teach them. In this workshop, we will consider the obstacles to long-lasting learning, including cramming, along with specific strategies to overcome that and other unproductive learning habits. Participants can expect to come away with the key principles for enduring learning, along with successful practices for the classroom and beyond that are grounded in recent learning science.

APPLY FOR THE 9:00 AM - 10:30 AM SESSION (EDT) — Thursday, October 6

APPLY FOR THE 11:00 AM - 12:30 PM SESSION (EDT) — Thursday, October 6

Robert DiYanniRobert DiYanni is a professor of humanities at New York University and a former instructional consultant for NYU’s Center for the Advancement of Teaching. He has written extensively on the teaching of literature and writing, on interdisciplinary humanities, and on critical and creative thinking. Among his recent books are Critical and Creative Thinking: A Brief Guide for Teachers and Critical Reading Across the Curriculum (both with Wiley-Blackwell); The Craft of College Teaching and You Are What You Read, both published by Princeton University Press. Additional information can be found at robertdiyanni.com.

Professor DiYanni also will be available for individual consultations on aspects of teaching to be determined by individuals who sign up for the service. These half-hour consultations, conducted via Zoom, are meant to help teachers respond effectively to challenges faced in their teaching. Topics will be determined by participating faculty members. Consultations will be offered on a rolling basis from late September through early November.

October 14, 9:00 am - 10:30 am (EDT) (POSTPONED)

October 14, 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm (EDT) (POSTPONED)

(POSTPONED) Time Management for Busy Academics (POSTPONED)

October 14, 9:00 am - 10:30 am (EDT)

October 14, 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm (EDT)

With Mary Deane Sorcinelli

Do you start your day with good intentions and finish your day further behind? Are you experiencing mental clutter, work overload, and the anxiety that comes from juggling too much? Faculty work includes a wide range of responsibilities and long lists of tasks that can become overwhelming. There is nothing you can do to get more time. But your work life might benefit from the application of some time management tips specific to faculty members. In this workshop, we will identify and try out strategies for time management, covering a wide range of topics from advice on scheduling meetings, managing email, and creating more space for writing and teaching.

APPLY FOR THE 9:00 AM - 10:30 AM SESSION (EDT) — Friday, October 14

APPLY FOR THE 12:00 PM - 1:30 PM SESSION (EDT) — Friday, October 14

Mary-Deane-SorcinelliMary Deane Sorcinelli is Professor Emeritus and Senior Fellow, Center for Teaching & Learning, University of Massachusetts Amherst and co-PI, Undergraduate STEM Education Initiative, Association of American Universities (AAU).  Mary Deane’s research is in the areas of faculty professional development in teaching, mentoring, scholarly writing, and the role of teaching centers in fostering 21st century faculty learning. She has published over 100 articles, book chapters and books.  She served as the president, POD Network in Higher Education; as a senior scholar, American Association for Higher Education (AAHE); as Educator in Residence at the National University of Singapore; and as a Fulbright Specialist in Education City, Qatar.  She has worked with colleges and universities in some 15 countries. Additional information can be found at www.umass.edu/ctl/about/our-team/mary-deane-sorcinelli.

Dr. Sorcinelli will be available for individual consultations on aspects of faculty and teaching development to be determined by individuals who sign up for the service. These consultations, conducted via Zoom, are meant to help instructors respond effectively to challenges faced in their academic lives. Prior consults have discussed a range of topics such as “motivating students,” “responding to a classroom observation,” “creating a mid-career faculty development plan,” “improving my annual faculty review narrative,” and “finding mentoring partners.” The half-hour consultations, which will be strictly confidential, will be offered on a rolling basis from late September through mid-November.

October 20, 9:00 am - 12:00 pm (EDT)

Becoming a Leader

October 20, 9:00 am - 12:00 pm (EDT)

With Margarita Benitez

In this workshop about leadership, we will examine two key questions:

  • Why do you want to be a leader?
  • What is the price you are willing to pay?

Participants will delve into these and related questions, which will provide opportunities for reflection, analysis, and discussion.

A central concept underlying this workshop is that of “Proyecto Vital” (Vital Project), developed by Spanish philosopher José Ortega y Gasset. “Proyecto Vital” provides the framework for an existential inquiry into what constitutes an authentic life, and what lies behind the professional choices you confront throughout your life.

Among the existential questions we will consider are these:

  1. Are you where you thought you would be at this stage of your life and career? What are the reasons for that?
  2. How do you reconcile the various demands of your lines of work?
  3. Whom do you serve and who do you follow? Why?

Our workshop will be practical, purposeful, and interactive. Participants can expect to come away with a deeper understanding of leadership as a concept and as an existential choice for their lives.

APPLY FOR THIS SESSION 9:00 AM – 12:00 PM (EDT) — Thursday, October 20

margarita-benitezMargarita Benítez’s lifelong involvement with higher education began at the University of Puerto Rico (UPR), where she was born and raised. At UPR, she was a professor of Spanish Literature and Humanities, as well as Chancellor of UPR’s Cayey Campus, and Acting Chancellor of UPR’s Humacao Campus.  After moving to Washington, DC in 1997, she held a number of senior positions in higher education organizations, such as the Office of Postsecondary Education in the U.S. Dept. of Education, the Institute for Higher Education Policy, Excelencia in Education, The Education Trust, and the American Council on Education.  In 2013, Dr. Benítez was one of four educators in the United States selected by Lumina Foundation for Education as a Lumina Fellow, in recognition of her work for access and success for underrepresented students. In September 2018, Benítez returned to Puerto Rico to serve as executive director of the Puerto Rico Endowment for the Humanities, a position she held until March 2022.

Dr. Benítez holds an undergraduate degree in philosophy, and graduate degrees in Hispanic Studies from Vassar College (BA), Middlebury College (MA), and Columbia University (PhD).

Plagiarism: Legal And Ethical Implications For The University

October 28, 10:00 am - 11:30 am (EDT)

With Audrey Wolfson Latourette

Plagiarism, the “scourge” of academia, has garnered increasing attention due to the purported evidence of mounting student purloining of others’ words and ideas prompted by the ubiquitous nature of Internet sources, and due to the notoriety attending infamous cases of plagiarism on the part of students, faculty and public figures.  Regarded as the academic death knell, plagiarism is frequently perceived by those in the public arena and the academy, as consistent with criminality and copyright infringement, and these erroneous perceptions have heightened the resistance to, and condemnation of, this ethical wrongdoing.  Public colleges and universities must afford students charged with plagiarism Fourteenth Amendment due process consistent with the Supreme Court’s articulation in Dixon v. Alabama State Board of Education, and its progeny; private institutions of higher education are compelled, by virtue of their contractual relationship with students, to provide such students good faith and fair dealing.  Yet within these broad constraints, it is evident that significant disparities exist regarding the definition of plagiarism employed, particularly as to whether authorial intent must be considered, and regarding the range and consistency, or lack thereof, of sanctions to be applied.  Recommendations will be proffered concerning the establishment of plagiarism policies that would achieve a more consistent and equitably applied approach, while upholding the goal of advancing ethics in academia.

The presentation will explore the history of plagiarism (Shakespeare’s peers deemed him “an upstart crow, beautified with our feathers”); contemporary definitions of plagiarism, the rationale for plagiarism’s purported prevalence, devices utilized for purposes of deterrence and detection, distinctions between plagiarism and copyright infringement, venues for plagiarism determinations, consequences to students versus faculty noting the particular impact on law students, ( including public humiliation, expulsion, revocation or rescission of degree, litigation), and recommendations regarding university policies that clearly define the term, set forth standards for determining plagiarism, and provide a flexible approach to penalties to be assessed that recognize the differences in the gravity of the purported plagiarism.

APPLY FOR THIS SESSION 10:00 AM – 11:30 AM (EDT) — Friday, October 28

Audrey Wolfson LatouretteAudrey Wolfson Latourette, M.A., J.D., is a cum laude graduate of Temple University School of Law where she was an Associate Editor of the Temple Law Quarterly.  Formerly associated with a large Philadelphia law firm, Latourette is a Distinguished Professor of Law at Stockton University.  She has given numerous presentations at regional, national and international conferences, garnering several Best Paper and Best Presentation Awards, including the “Distinguished Presentation Award for Outstanding Scholarship” awarded by the Pacific South West Academy of Legal Studies in Business for “First Amendment Rights on University Campuses” and the “Best Paper Award” for “The Future Impact of Women in the Law Profession” awarded by the North East Academy of Legal Studies in Business.

Latourette’s publications address issues such as:  sex discrimination in the legal profession, legal and ethical implications of plagiarism, copyright implications of online education, legal issues related to transfer students and relevant policies, legal implications of academic advising, legal issues related to the surrogate mother contract, judicial intervention in the student – university relationship premised on due process and contract theories, Title IX issues of due process and First Amendment rights, and abortion from both an historical perspective and court rulings. Her publications appear in resources such as the Journal of College and University Law, published by the National Association of College and University Attorneys, Journal of Law, Business & Ethics, University of Richmond Law Review, University of Detroit Law Review and the Center for the Study of Federalism, among others.  Current research addresses the violation of First Amendment rights on university campuses for both students and the professoriate.

Special Disciplinary Programs

Teaching about Climate Change, Solutions and Justice

With David Blockstein, Eban Goodstein, Margaret Wang, and Natalie Marsh

Climate Change is not only a global emergency, but it is also an educational imperative. It is critical that colleges and universities educate their students about an issue that affects every aspect of their lives. Education about climate solutions and justice transcends all disciplines. Students want to participate in these tough conversations.

Bard College’s (NY) Graduate Programs in Sustainability will provide a set of professional development workshops focused on preparing educators from all fields to teach about climate solutions and climate justice.  These workshops are aimed at faculty who do not generally incorporate climate issues in their teaching. Research shows that the integration of sustainability and societal issues in disciplinary teaching increases interest, engagement, performance and retention of students.

Sessions include how to teach about climate change in all disciplines; how to help students combat climate despair; how to find valuable content in your field; and how to engage with artists and arts educators.

Each of the 90-minute sessions is self-contained, thus allowing participants to attend anywhere from a single session to the full suite of four sessions—and any number in between.

September 28, 10:00 -11:30 am (EDT)

#MakeClimateAClass: Teaching about Climate Change in All Disciplines

September 28, 10:00 -11:30 am (EDT)

with David Blockstein and Eban Goodstein

  • How educators in every field can incorporate climate change, solutions and justice into their classes
  • How educators from different fields can collaborate to enhance student learning
  • How to participate in the Worldwide Teach-In on Climate and Justice March 29, 2023.

APPLY FOR THIS SESSION 10:00 AM – 11:30 AM (EDT) — Wednesday, September 28

October 12, 10:00-11:30 am (EDT)

Helping Your Students to Combat Climate Despair

October 12, 10:00-11:30 am (EDT)

with David Blockstein and Eban Goodstein

APPLY FOR THIS SESSION 10:00 AM – 11:30 AM (EDT) — Wednesday, October 12

David E. BlocksteinDavid E. Blockstein, Ph.D. co-directs Solve Climate by 2030, a project of Bard College’s graduate programs in sustainability that features the Worldwide Teach-In on Climate and Justice (www.worldwideteachin.org).  Dr. Blockstein is an ecologist and conservation biologist with more than 30 years of national leadership at the interface of science and environmental policy. Dr. Blockstein has worked on a wide range of science and policy issues including climate change and energy education, biodiversity policy, sustainability, increasing the representation of minorities in science, mechanisms to improve the linkages between science and decision making on environmental issues, and digital communication of scientific information on the environment.

He helped to create the National Council for Science and the Environment (NCSE), with a mission to improve the scientific basis of environmental decisionmaking, and served as its first Executive Director in 1990. He held a variety of leadership positions at NCSE until leaving as Chief Scientist in 2018. He was the principal organizer of 15 NCSE national conferences and global forums on science, policy and the environment. At NCSE, Dr. Blockstein co-founded the Council of Environmental Deans and Directors (CEDD), the Council of Energy Research and Education Leaders (CEREL), and the US Partnership for Education for Sustainable Development and the Association for Environmental Studies and Sciences (AESS).

Dr. Blockstein is the author with Leo A.W. Weigman of The Climate Solutions Consensus: What We Know and What to Do About It published by Island Press, 2010.


Eban GoodsteinEban Goodstein is an economist and Director of the Graduate Programs in Sustainability at Bard College in New York, USA. Goodstein has coordinated a series of international educational initiatives on climate change involving over 2500 colleges, universities, high schools and community organizations worldwide. He is the author of three books:  a college textbook, Economics and the Environment, now in its ninth edition; Fighting for Love in the Century of Extinction: How Passion and Politics Can Stop Global Warming; and The Trade-off Myth: Fact and Fiction about Jobs and the Environment. Articles by Goodstein have appeared in The Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Land Economics, Ecological Economics, and Environmental Management, among other outlets. His research has been featured in The New York Times, Scientific American, Time, Chemical and Engineering News, The Economist, USA Today, and The Chronicle of Higher Education. He serves on the editorial board of Sustainability: The Journal of Record, and was a member of the Board of Directors of the Follett Corporation. He holds a B.A. (Geology) from Williams College and a Ph.D. (Economics) from the University of Michigan.

October 19, 10:00-11:30 am (EDT)

SubjectToClimate: A Toolkit for Introductory Higher Education and Secondary Education

October 19, 10:00-11:30 am (EDT)

with David Blockstein and Margaret Wang

  • SubjectToClimate is a nonprofit, online connector to enhance climate change knowledge and inspire action by making climate change teaching and learning accessible to all.
  • How educators of all subjects can use SubjectToClimate to find credible, engaging, and unbiased materials on climate change at no cost.

APPLY FOR THIS SESSION 10:00 AM – 11:30 AM (EDT) — Wednesday, October 19


Margaret-WangMargaret Wang is the COO and co-founder of SubjectToClimate. She was a high school teacher, primarily in economics and business, for several years before she pursued an M.Ed. in international education policy at Harvard Graduate School of Education. Working with Professor Fernando Reimers, she authored and edited several books regarding education reform: Education and Climate Change: The Role of Universities, Education to Build Back Better: What We Can Learn from Education Reform for a Post-pandemic World, and An educational calamity: Learning and teaching during the Covid-19 pandemic. She also worked with Harvard Library and Harvard Office for Sustainability to train Harvard staff members to be climate educators. The results from this training and how it could apply to other universities can be found in their article, “Empowering Staff Members to Improve Student Learning in Sustainability Projects” through the Journal of Sustainability Education.  She also holds a B.A. (East Asian Studies, Teacher Preparation Program) from Princeton University.

Engaging with your Museum or Gallery in Climate Education

October 26, 10:00-11:30 am (EDT)

with David Blockstein and Natalie R. Marsh

  • Virtual Visiting Artists (ViVA) is a nonprofit and curatorial platform with a focus on connecting internationally-recognized artists and projects emphasizing women, BIPOC, LGBTQ+, and social justice to students, educators, and communities across all disciplines and ages.
  • How artists and educators can collaborate to increase student awareness and engagement in climate change, political discourse, equity and social justice, the future of work, higher education and technology.

APPLY FOR THIS SESSION 10:00 AM – 11:30 AM (EDT) — Wednesday, October 26

Natalie R. MarshDr. Natalie R. Marsh is the Co-founder, Executive Director and Chief Curator of the nonprofit ViVA Virtual Visiting Artists, a low-carbon education and curatorial platform connecting internationally-recognized artists and projects emphasizing women, BIPOC, LGBTQ+, and social justice to diverse students, educators, and communities across all disciplines and ages. In 2022, she began to develop touring exhibitions featuring ViVA and other artists for galleries, museums and university centers. She has 30+ years experience in the arts, serving as the founding director and chief curator of multiple academic exhibition and museum programs. She has curated 200+ exhibitions, projects, symposia and public programs. She currently serves on the board of the Association of Academic Museums & Galleries, and as co-director of the annual AAMG conference program.
Past Programs

 

Summer 2022 Workshop Led by Beverly and Bob Kahn

  • How to Write Competitive Grant Proposals

 

Summer 2022 Workshops Led by Robert DiYanni

  • Practicing Critical & Creative Thinking (Three-day Seminar)

Each of the two-hour seminar sessions was self-contained, thus allowing participants to attend anywhere from a single session to the full suite of six sessions—and any number in between.

Day One

Morning: 

  • Introductions
  • What is higher order thinking? Who exemplifies higher order thinking?
  • Parables as Provocations
  • Going Meta: Parables + / Discussion

Afternoon: 

  • Why Use and Teach Critical and Creative Thinking Together? Daniel Pink and Sir Ken Robinson
  • Parallel Thinking: Six Thinking Hats—Edward de Bono—Application of the hats approach

Day Two

Morning: 

  • Lateral Thinking: Edward de Bono—Random word exercise
  • Thinking With and Through Visuals—Exercises

Afternoon: 

  • Design Thinking: Principles, Paradoxes & More, Pearson Guide to Thinking, DiYanni
  • Thinking about Language: Hayakawa—Connotation and Metaphor, Exercises

Day Three

Morning: 

  • Creative Thinking I: Roger Von Oech, Creative Whacks and Kicks—Exercises
  • Creative Thinking II: Michael Michalko, Thinkertoys & Creative Thinkering—Exercises

Afternoon: 

  • Decision Thinking: Critical and Creative Thinking, Chapter 6, DiYanni
  • Ethics and Thinking: Critical & Creative Thinking, Chapter 5, DiYanni

Spring 2022 Workshops Led by Robert DiYanni

  • Making Learning Last
  • Assessment & Grading
  • Technology and Teaching
  • Writing a Book Proposal and Securing a Publishing Contract

 


 

Spring 2022 Workshop Led by Mary Deane Sorcinelli

  • Time Management for Busy Academics

 


 

Spring 2022 Special Disciplinary Programs With Michael Dinwiddie

  • Castoff Treasures: the Artist/scholar Model in the 21st Century

 

Scholars share knowledge and explore new ways of thinking through books, articles, lectures, and monographs. Artists likewise illuminate pathways into our humanity with the visual and performing arts. What is the artist/scholar model and where was it developed? Is such a configuration necessary in modern society? What is lost or gained with a bifurcation of these roles? And, how does the artist/scholar model help us discern value and worth in social action and activism? As found objects are reshaped through scholarship and artistic practice, they become treasured works that provide a rich palimpsest for future generations to discover. Featured readings examined the castoff roots of such disparate creators as the Gee Bend Quilters, painter John Singer Sargent, photographer Deb Willis, sculptor Richard Howard Hunt, and singer Lauryn Hill, among others.


 

Spring 2022 Special Disciplinary Programs With Ali Banuazizi and Thomas Barfield

  • Afghanistan: the Land, the People, and the Refugee Crisis

 

This seminar served as a review and analysis of the last five decades of instability in Afghanistan. It also brought to light the pressing needs of the tens-of-thousands of young Afghans who have been given refuge in the United States and explore ways that TFC institutions can welcome, accommodate, and provide educational opportunities for certain members of these refugee groups.

The first sessions devoted to a brief overview of Afghan history and politics, with a focus on the turbulent decades since the Saur revolution of 1978, including the Soviet invasion and occupation of the country (1979-89), the rise of the Taliban and their first period of rule (early 1990s to 2001), and the twenty-year war and state-building efforts by the U.S. and its Western allies (2001-2021). The destructive impact of these events on the lives and livelihood of ordinary Afghans, the bloody inter-ethnic and sectarian conflicts which they generated or intensified, and the massive flight of millions of Afghans to neighboring countries as refugees will be discussed. Included in this overview accounts of the expanded educational opportunities (particularly for young women) and chances for various kinds of civic engagements, entrepreneurial activities, and employment that developed in Kabul and other major urban centers during these same tumultuous years.

The second session of the seminar focused on the consequences of the precipitous U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan and the collapse of its central government in August, 2021, and the fate of tens-of-thousands who were lifted out of the country in the final days of that withdrawal and many other politically vulnerable individuals and families who were left behind in desperation. More specifically, the current efforts by the U.S. government, aid agencies, and private groups to settle these refugees (for which the U.S. Congress has allocated over seven billion dollars) will be discussed in detail. The overriding goal of the session pursued in the give-and-takes among the participants and the TFC coordinators exploring ways in which academic institutions—with potential financial support by the government, aid agencies, and philanthropic groups—can accommodate and provide educational opportunities for the younger members of these refugee groups in their respective communities. We should note that efforts similar to the one proposed here are being made by various other groups (most notably U.S. veterans who served in Afghanistan), a recently-formed consortium of universities, and several private philanthropic organizations.


 

Fall 2021 Workshops Led by Robert DiYanni

  • Motivating Student Learning
  • Discussion-based Teaching
  • Publishing Your Book: an Overview
  • Writing & Learning

 


 

Fall 2021 Faculty Focus Groups Convened by Mary Deane Sorcinelli

  • Four Faculty Forums

Contact Us

The membership includes Historically Black Colleges and Universities, Hispanic-Serving Institutions, Community Colleges, Liberal Arts Colleges, and International Colleges and Universities. Affiliates include Research Universities and Higher Education Organizations.
The membership includes Historically Black Colleges and Universities, Hispanic-Serving Institutions, Community Colleges, Liberal Arts Colleges, and International Colleges and Universities. Affiliates include Research Universities and Higher Education Organizations.

TFC Founding Executive Director

The founding Executive Director of The Faculty Collaborative is Debra M. Szybinski. Most recently Dr. Szybinski has served as Executive Director of the Faculty Resource Network (1996-2019)—a partnership of over 50 colleges and universities throughout the U.S. that provided professional development opportunities for its member institutions; and as Executive Director of the Office of Faculty Resources and the Center for the Advancement of Teaching (2008-2019) at New York University (NYU). Under her leadership, the Faculty Resource Network was an award-winning, nationally-recognized faculty development initiative.

Dr. Szybinski received her B.A. from Barnard College and her Ph.D. from Columbia University.